Gaza Disengagement

There is a profound lack of knowledge of the Jewish Biblical and modern historical connections to Gaza.

Gaza is mentioned several times in the Torah. Its size, shape, region and identifying markers are precisely mentioned and illustrated. Gaza is but another area of Jewish land that has been stolen from Jews by Arabs via fabrications, historical revisionism, literal land grabs and genocide against the indigenous Jews of Israel.

The following Biblical references should help you in talking points on the subject:

Biblically speaking:

1. Genesis 15 – The area in which Gaza is located was included as part of Abraham’s inheritance.

2. Numbers 34:2-6 – The Bible details precisely the northern, southern, eastern and western borders of ancient Israel. Readers should note that in every reference there is a body of water – the Mediterranean Sea, a lake, a river and a wadi (a dry river bed that flows only after an infrequent heavy rain). Bodies of water are permanent markers in most cases. In Numbers 34:5 with reference to the southern border it states: From Azmon the boundary shall turn towards the Wadi of Egypt (near el-Arish) and terminate at the sea (Mediterranean). This would include the entire present-day Gaza Strip and additional land in the Sinai.

3. Joshua 13:2 – The Lord said to Joshua: This is the territory that remains to be conquered: all the districts of the Philistines, those of the Gerurites, from the Shihon, which is close to Egypt, to the territory of Ekron in the north, are accounted. Canaanite, namely those of the five lords of the Philistines – the Gazities (Gaza), the Ashdodites (Ashdod) etc.

4. Joshua 15:47 - Most Biblical commentators hold that the modern day Gaza Strip was within the territory allotted to the tribe of Judah.

5. Consider in Joshua Chapter 15: This was the portion of the tribe of Judea (15:20); Ekron, with its dependencies and villages (15:45); Ekron, westward, all the towns in the vicinity and Ashdod, with their villages (15:46); Ashdod, its dependencies and its villages, Gaza, its dependencies and its villages, all the way to the Wadi of Egypt and the edge of the Mediterranean Sea (15:47).

6. Judges 1:18 - And Israel captured Gaza and its territory, Ashkelon and its territory, and Ekron and its territory.

7. Kings 5:1 – Solomon’s rule extended over all the kingdoms from the Euphrates to the land of the Philistines and the boundary of Egypt (Wadi of Egypt or to el-Arish).

8. Ezekiel 47:19-20 – 47:19 The southern limit shall run: A line from Tamar to the waters of Meriboth-kadesh, along the Wadi (of Egypt and ) the Great Sea (Mediterranean). That is the southern limit.

Historically speaking:

* During the 3rd century BCE, Gaza and Akko were the leading centers of trade and industry. Both cities had numerous Jewish residents, including some very wealthy and influential families. [1]

* There were Jewish communities in Gaza during the Hasmonean period (166-63 BCE).

* During ancient times, in the taking of tithes (shmittah), the Gaza area was included in this Jewish religious obligation. Shmittah is observed to this day in Jewish settlemens located in the Gaza Strip as it was deemed part of ancient Eretz Israel.

* During the 4th century CE, Emperor Constantine attempted to build a church in Gaza but the Jewish population located there was opposed to this.
At that time, Gaza was the principal port for trade and commerce for the Jewish population of the Holy Land. A very ancient synagogue was excavated there some time ago. Influential rabbis, Israel Najara, author of the popular prayer and Shabbat song Kah Ribon Olam, and Rabbi Avraham Azoulai, the renowned mekubal, lived in Gaza Jewish communities.

* During the 7th century CE: “When the Arab hosts now began spreading northward, they encountered the first focus of resistance in the city of Gaza, then occupied by a strong Byzantine garrison under the command of the provincial governor, Sergius. At that time Gaza embraced a substantial Jewish settlement, in fact the most important community in Judea. Jews seem to have fought alongside the Byzantines in the ensuing battle, which ended in Sergius’ defeat.” [2]

* Also during this period, “Saccording to the famous grammarian, Jonah ibn Janah, Gaza, too, lost its status as the foremost community in Judea, but it remained a center of learning and well-developed community life.” [3]

* From 1885 to World War I Jews lived in Gaza.

* A renewed Jewish community existed in Gaza until the Muslim pogroms against Jews in 1929. Jews were murdered in many communities throughout Palestine, especially Jerusalem, Hebron and Safed – three Jewish holy cities.

The following is a list of Jewish communities in the Gaza Strip that no longer exist because they were destroyed by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement.  In 2005, the government of Israel began the Gaza Disengagement, where 9,000 Jewish residents were evicted from their homes. Despite mass rallies against the disengagement, and an orange-ribbon campaign, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon implemented the plan with the hope of reducing security concerns and diffusing the demographic problem of Gaza’s 1.5 million Arabs. Upon completion of the evacuation, all 21 Jewish communities in Gaza were bulldozed and destroyed. Only the synagogues were left standing; these were then torched by Arab mobs:

Alei Sinai, founded in 1983, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Bedolach, founded in 1986, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Bnei Atzmon (Atzmona), founded in 1979, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Dugit, founded in 1990, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Gadid, founded in 1982, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Gan-Or, founded in 1983, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Ganei Tal, founded in 1979, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Katif, founded in 1986, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Kerem Atzmona, founded in 2000, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Kfar Darom, founded in 1946, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Kfar Yam, founded in 1984, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Morag, founded in 1984, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Netzer Hazani, founded in 1977, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Netzarim, founded in 1984, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Neve Dekalim, founded in 1983, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Nisanit, founded in 1984, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Peat – Sadeh, founded in 1989, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Rafiah – Yam, founded in 1986, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Shirat HaYam, founded in 2000, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs
Tel Katifa, founded in 1992, destroyed in 2005 by the Israeli government during the Gaza Disengagement and handed over to Arabs

Notes:
[1] A Social and Religious History of the Jews, Salo Wittmayer Baron,
Vol 1,
page 255, (Original copyright 1937)
[2] Ibid, Vol 3, page 87
[3] Ibid, page 102

References to Jewish Connections to Gaza by Anthony David Marks: Israel Hasbara Committee

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Home Game, the movie, takes place June 21, 2005 three weeks before the Israeli government closes Gush Katif in preparation for the disengagement plan.

Home Game, the movie is about the last youth basketball tournament during the Gaza disengagement and it will be online for FREE, for the three weeks from the July 8th, until July 29th.

Click here to watch it.

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Via Aish: Today In Jewish History

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In 2005, the government of Israel began the Gaza Disengagement, where 9,000 Jewish residents were evicted from their homes. Despite mass rallies against the disengagement, and an orange-ribbon campaign, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon implemented the plan with the hope of reducing security concerns and diffusing the demographic problem of Gaza’s 1.5 million Arabs. Upon completion of the evacuation, all 21 Jewish communities in Gaza were bulldozed and destroyed. Only the synagogues were left standing; these were then torched by Arab mobs.